The Contents of the European Investment Law and Arbitration Review, Vol. 5 (2020)

Prof. Nikos Lavranos & Prof. Loukas Mistelis (Co-Editors in Chief)

We are very pleased and proud to present the fifth issue of the European Investment Law and Arbitration Review (EILA Rev) 2020.

As of 23 December 2020, all articles of this volume can be ordered online at Brill Publishers:

The stormy developments of the past years regarding international investment law and arbitration broadly understood, which to a large extent were driven by various EU institutions – European Commission, Court of Justice of the EU and the European Parliament – have confirmed the need for a legal journal such as this Review that exclusively tracks these developments and provides a forum for debate on the current state of affairs and future developments.

The Achmea judgment, the termination agreement regarding intra- EU BITs, CETA, Opinion 1/17, Brexit, the ISDS reform efforts in the UNCITRAL Working Group III and the ECT, are just a few of the topics that have been featured and continue to feature in a broad range of different contexts in this Review.

This issue opens with an article by Sarah Vasani and Nathalie Allen, which highlights the need of effective investment protection in order to ensure that the Paris Climate targets are reached by an increase in foreign direct investments in renewable energy. Often investment protection and environmental protection are presented as opposing, mutually exclusive interests; however, the authors convincingly argue that the contrary is true.

Elizabeth Chan’s article turns to Brexit and its potential for post- Brexit UK to design its foreign investment policy anew – independent from the EU.

Subsequently, Alexander Leventhal and Akshay Shreedhar analyze the practice of the European Commission intervening in arbitration proceedings by way of using amicus curiae briefs. They discuss the question whether, and if so, to what extent the European Commission can be considered a neutral friend of the tribunal or rather must be considered a third party with a particular interest – usually in support of the Member State concerned – which would have to be qualified as a potential abuse of the amicus curiae briefs tool.

Brady Gordon’s article provides a critical and sceptical analysis of the CJEU’s case law regarding CETA.

This is followed by David Sandberg and Jacob Rosell Svensson’s article regarding the implications of Achmea for national court challenge proceedings. They highlight the huge impact of Achmea for many on- going proceedings before domestic courts in various jurisdictions.

Samantha Rowe and Nelson Goh (former Managing Editor of this Review) explain how perceived norm conflicts regarding the January 2019 EU Member States Declarations on the consequences of the Achmea judgment can be resolved through principles of treaty interpretation.

Nikos Lavranos concludes this series of Achmea related articles by offering his analysis on the recently signed termination agreement, which would effectively terminate most intra-EU BITs.

As in the past years, we also run an Essay Competition, which resulted in many outstanding submissions. Indeed, this year the quality was so high that the Editorial Team decided to award, next to the first prize winner, two joint second prize winners rather than a second and third prize winner.

Crawford Jamieson is the first prize winner of the Essay Competition 2020 with his submission, which assesses the CJEU’s decisions in Achmea and Opinion 1/ 17 regarding CETA in light of the proposed Multilateral Investment Court (MIC). He shows that there are considerable flaws and inconsistencies in the CJEU’s jurisprudence, which can only be explained by political motivations in order to lend support to the MIC.

Joint second prize winner, Robert Bradshaw, illustrates with his submission that international investment law is in need of a proportionality test. The other joint second prize winners, Florence Humblet and Kabir Duggal, provide an extensive analysis for using Article 37 of the EU Charter as a defence for Climate Change and environmental measures in Investor-State arbitration disputes.

The case-note section is opened by Cees Verburg who analyses the Hague Court of Appeals’ decision, which overturned the lower courts’ decision to annul the USD 50 billion Yukos award. This decision reinstated the award, while at the same time triggered an appeal by the Russian Federation before the Dutch Supreme Court. Thus, there will be another, final, round.

Bianca McDonnell examined the Adamakopoulos v. Cyprus Decision on Jurisdiction by the ICSID arbitral tribunal. This decision is particularly interesting regarding the dissenting opinion of one arbitrator concerning the alleged incompatibility of the bit s and the EU Treaties as well as regarding the aspect of the mass claim nature of the proceeding.

Finally, Alesia Tsiabus and Guillaume Croisant discuss the lessons learned from the Micula saga for the relationship between international investment law and EU competition law.

The focus section on the Young ITA event on investment arbitration and the environment continues the theme, that was initiated by the first article in this Review. The focus section encompasses several written contributions of the presentations given at the Young ITA event held on 5 November 2019 in London.

This section is opened by an extensive analysis of Laura Rees-Evans in which she explains the recent developments and prospects of reform regarding the protection of the environment in international investment agreements.

Crina Baltag looks at the doctrine of police powers in relation to the protection of the environment, while Anna Bilanova explains the option of using environmental counterclaims. This is followed by a discussion of Guarav Sharma on environmental claims by States in investment treaty arbitration.

Finally, Nikos Lavranos, the other Co- Editor-in-Chief of this Review, looks at the (ab)use of third- party submissions in investment treaty arbitration proceedings.

The EFILA focus section contains a summary of the keynote delivered by Meg Kinnear at the 5th EFILA Annual Conference with a particular focus on using ADR tools in investment disputes.

This is followed by the text of the 5th EFILA Annual Lecture delivered by Prof. Laurence Boisson de Chazournes on navigating multiple proceedings in the light of the proliferation of courts and tribunals.

Finally, three book reviews wrap up this issue. Nikos Lavranos looks at the new Practical Commentary on the ICSID Convention, while Nelson Goh (former Managing Editor of this Review) reviews a Case Book on International Law in Domestic Courts and Trisha Mitra (Co- Managing Editor of this Review) examines the book on the future of Investment Treat Arbitration in the EU.

We are confident that this year’s 480 page volume underscores again the raison d’être for publishing this Review, which covers such a dynamic field of law.

In order to produce an interesting volume next year yet again, we invite unpublished, high-quality submissions (long and short articles as well as case notes) that fall within the scope of this Review.

The Call for Papers and the house style requirements are published on the Review’s website:

In addition, we will also again run an Essay Competition. All information regarding the 2021 Essay Competition will be published on the Review’s website:

Table of Contents of the European Investment Law and Arbitration Review 2020

Articles

1 No Green without More Green: The Importance of Protecting FDI through International Investment Law to Meet the Climate Change Challenge 3

Sarah Z. Vasani and Nathalie Allen

2 The UK’s Post- Brexit Investment Policy: An Opportunity for New Design Choices 40

Elizabeth Chan

3 The European Commission: Ami Fidèle or Faux Ami? 70

Alexander G. Leventhal and Akshay Shreedhar

4 A Sceptical Analysis of the Enforcement of ISDS Awards in the EU Following the Decision of the CJEU on CETA 92

Brady Gordon

5 Achmea and the Implications for Challenge Proceedings before National Courts 146

David Sandberg and Jacob Rosell Svensson

6 Resolving Perceived Norm Conflict through Principles of Treaty Interpretation: The January 2019 EU Member State’s Declarations 167

Samantha J. Rowe and Nelson Goh

7 The World after the Termination of intra-EU BITs 196

Nikos Lavranos

Essay Competition 2020

8 Assessing the CJEU’s Decisions in Achmea and Opinion 1/ 17 in Light of the Proposed Multilateral Investment Court – Winner of the Essay Competition 2020 215

Crawford Jamieson

9 Legal Stability and Legitimate Expectations: Does International Investment Law Need a Sense of Proportion? – Joint 2nd Prize Winner of the Essay Competition 2020 240

Robert Bradshaw

10 If You are not Part of the Solution, You are the Problem: Article 37 of the EU Charter as a Defence for Climate Change and Environmental Measures in Investor- State Arbitrations – Joint 2nd Prize Winner Essay Competition 2020 265

Florence Humblet and Kabir Duggal

Case- Notes

11 The Hague Court of Appeal Reinstates the Yukos Awards 299

Cees Verburg

12 Theodoros Adamakopoulos and Others v. Republic of Cyprus, ICSID Case No Arb/15/49, Decision on Jurisdiction, 7 February 2020 315

Bianca McDonnell

13 Investment Arbitration and EU (Competition) Law – Lessons Learned from the Micula Saga

Alesia Tsiabus and Guillaume Croisant 330

Focus section on the Young ITA Event: Investment Arbitration and the Environment – Emerging Themes

14 The Protection of the Environment in International Investment Agreements – Recent Developments and Prospects for Reform 357

Laura Rees- Evans

15 Investment Arbitration and Police Powers: Emerging Issues 392

Crina Baltag

16 Environmental Counterclaims in Investment Arbitration 400

Anna Bilanová

17 Environmental Claims by States in Investment Treaty Arbitration 412

Gaurav Sharma

18 The (ab)use of Third- Party Submissions 426

Nikos Lavranos

Focus Section on EFILA

19 ADR in Investment Disputes: The Role of Complementary Mechanisms – Keynote to the 5th EFILA Annual Conference 2020 439

Meg Kinnear

20 The Proliferation of Courts and Tribunals: Navigating Multiple Proceedings – 5th EFILA Annual Lecture 2019 447

Laurence Boisson de Chazournes

Book Reviews

21 The ICSID Convention, Regulations and Rules – A practical Commentary 471

Nikos Lavranos

22 International Law in Domestic Courts: A Case Book 473

Nelson Goh

23 The Future of Investment Treaty Arbitration in the EU: intra-EU BITs, the Energy Charter Treaty, and the Multilateral Investment Court 475

Trisha Mitra

A New And Improved Investment Protection Regime: Truth Or Myth!

Shilpa Singh Jaswant, LLM (Hamburg)

The proposed investment court system by the European Commission aims to limit criticism revolved around Investor-State Dispute Settlement due to its lack of legitimacy, transparency and appellate mechanism. The investment regime under Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement with Canada (hereinafter “CETA”) and European Union-Viet Nam Free Trade Agreement (hereinafter “EUVFTA”) could be a solution by bringing transparency, consistency and institutionalisation in investment protection. The blog addresses the compatibility of the new system with EU law as any violation to autonomy of EU law as laid down in the previous judgments would not be optimistic to its future and followed by other blog in future would address the features of the Tribunal system and its difference from arbitration. Meanwhile Member states of the EU seek opinion from the Court of Justice (hereinafter “the CJEU”) though it is promising and would lay down stepping stones of an improved investment protection.

Achmea ruling and its effect to jurisdiction of the Tribunal under CETA and EUVFTA

Achmea ruling confirms that intra-EU BITs are incompatible with EU law while its effects reverberate to agreements entered by the EU with third countries. As per the CJEU in Achmea in para 58 (also in Opinion 1/09 of 08.03.201, para 89), arbitral tribunals under investment agreements, when entered between Member states, are outside the judicial system of the EU and incompatible with autonomy of EU law since arbitral tribunals were empowered under the principle of lex loci arbitri to include and interpret EU law (the Community treaties and secondary laws). However, the ruling may not be applicable in full since investment protection in CETA and EUVFTA are concluded as mixed agreements meaning the EU and its Member states are parties to them.

A logical conclusion is that the Tribunal established under CETA and EUVFTA would not fall within judicial framework of the EU since its jurisdiction is limited to claims related to breaches of investment agreements and to determine if a measure of a Member state and/ or of the EU is in violation of the standards set in the agreements. It can only resolve a dispute under the applicable law i.e., the provisions of investment agreement.

The CJEU places responsibility on arbitral tribunal to protect autonomy of EU law by not giving inconsistent interpretation to it. In the past the CJEU in Opinion 2/13 of 18.12.2014 and Opinion 1/09 in para 65 has protected autonomy of EU in many cases and call it as the “essential” characteristics originating from an independent source of law, i.e., the Treaties. Further saying that standard of review to protect autonomy of EU law is a matter of these tribunals and Member states too. Since the CJEU has never been eager to open doors of interpretation to a tribunal which is out of the EU judicial framework and Member states are obligated to bring issues related to EU law to the CJEU.

On the contrary, if the CJEU finds that the Tribunal under CETA and EUVFTA is part of judicial framework of the EU and that it could send for preliminary ruling under Article 267 TFEU departing from its previous judgments, even then it has responsibility to protect autonomy of EU law along with uniform and consistent interpretation and application of EU law. In both situations, an interpretation of EU law done by the tribunals may affect the consistency. However, by looking at the features (as discussed below) of the Tribunal assure that autonomy of EU law is protected, at least in theory.

Ensure jurisdiction of domestic courts and CJEU

CETA in Article 8.22(1)(f) & (g) and EUVFTA in Article 3.34 (1) preclude parallel proceedings at a domestic or international court or tribunal so as to not to undermine the authority of tribunals which could mean taking away exclusive jurisdiction of the CJEU.  Even when the agreements do not allow parallel proceedings for disputes related to an alleged measure which is inconsistent with agreements, the Tribunal is under obligation by Article 8.24 CETA and Article 3.34(8) EUVFTA to stay its proceedings or take into account proceedings under international agreement which may affect the findings of the Tribunal or the compensation awarded due to the use of “shall”. Article 8.28 CETA and Article 3.42 (1) EUVFTA assure that in case the Tribunal fail to do so, appellate body has authority to modify or reverse award on “manifest errors in the appreciation of facts, including….. relevant domestic law”. It is important that the tribunals under agreements take into consideration decisions of the CJEU and domestic courts effectively and importantly, ensure supremacy of EU law and full respect to decisions of the CJEU.

Perhaps the limited scope of disputes of the Tribunal done by the drafters of the agreements, especially interpretation and application of EU law is a solution to it. The tribunals under Article 8.31 CETA and Article 3.42(3) EUVFTA are not allowed to interpret and apply the provision of EU Treaties including prevailing domestic laws and shall follow the prevailing interpretation given to the domestic law. While determining consistency of measures, it has to consider the domestic law as matter of fact which also includes EU law.

Issue of competence and international responsibility

After the opinion of the CJEU on EU-Singapore FTA, it is important to look at nature of agreement concluded: CETA and EUVFTA are concluded as mixed. It is clear that the question of competence would not affect the interpretation of the investment agreements done by the tribunals. The question of determining obligation arising from the agreements whether it would be responsibility of the EU or Member states requires interpretation of the agreements and due to their drafting it would be within the jurisdiction of the CJEU. The agreements have placed obligation of international responsibility on the EU to determine respondent.

In other words, the right to access tribunal as per the rules to determine respondent by the EU in both agreements would allow foreign investors to initiate proceedings without affecting the autonomy of EU law, supremacy of EU law and would promote legal certainty. This conclusion would also put away any future doubts on competences, inter alia on law making and concluding the agreement between Member states and the EU which would be mutually exclusive of the determination of respondent done to fix international responsibility. The issue of competence would however justify the reason to conclude the agreements as mixed agreements since some areas are shared between the EU and its Member states.

Unique features of the Investment court system

The institutionalization would ensure legitimacy and consistency to decisions after introducing an appellate body. While allowing participation of non-disputing third parties and interpretations of provisions to the agreements from scholars and person of interest, having compulsory resolution through amicable mechanism like conciliation and mediation and transparency are front runners. The members of tribunals are appointed by a committee as per the agreement while cases are allotted on random basis to a roster of judges much like done in WTO panel. After the award, the Tribunal would be dissolved and question of sending back to the same tribunal after appellate body’s decision is still unanswered. Moreover, it does not contribute to ‘permanent structure’ since members are paid retainer fees and not salary, and are allowed to take up other occupation unless otherwise decided. It can still be said that the system is not balanced out and independent, instead it seems semi-permanent or hybrid.

Due to proliferation of investment agreements, the tribunals organized may give arise to different conclusions relating to similar commercial situation and similar investment rights to the similar in the provisions of these agreements questioning procedural fairness. None of the agreements deal with correlation of the tribunals. Also another procedural flaw observed that both the agreements do not directly deal with a question on jurisdiction and thus the parties have to wait until the final award is issued to appeal a positive or mixed jurisdiction award.

In sum, the investment protection in the agreement has room for improvement and that can be done by creating a new regime of investment protection with a multilateral investment court which would be permanent in nature with full tenured and impartial judges for the problem of coherence and determinacy. The consistency would be ensured with a permanent appellate mechanism and the treaties would be considered at par with one another. As concluding remarks, the present system in the agreements are a way forward to institutionalise investment protection but this optimism should not be taken blindly and hinder improvement and develop a better system.

Report on the AIA, EFILA and CIArb Event: Updates on EU Law Related Arbitration: A Selection of New, Controversial and Hot Topics

Nikoletta Kallasidou and Michal Mojto, AIA, Brussels

The Arbitration for International Arbitration (AIA), EFILA and the CIArb jointly organised a well-attended event  at the VUB University in Brussels on the 27th of May, bringing two panels of experts to discuss recent developments on EU-related arbitration. Contentious issues such as the Brussels I Bis Regulation, the arbitrability of EU competition claims, state aid, human rights and investment arbitration under BITs/ MITs were raised and discussed. A lively discussion during the Q&A session following each panel, greatly benefiting both the panellists and the audience.

Thoughts on  Brexit – Effects on Investment Arbitration

In light of the upcoming EU referendum due to take place on the 23th of June 2016, Dr. Christophe Guilbert de Bruet, the first speaker of the day, provided a particularly useful insight on potential consequences of a Brexit in the context of investment arbitration. The presentation began with an overview of the Brexit process. Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty shall be interpreted as requiring both parties to negotiate in good faith as well as obliging the EU to conclude a withdrawal agreement. Dr Christophe highlighted the importance of the negotiation process as a means of mitigating potential adverse effects of the Brexit.

Turning to the options of the UK has upon withdrawal, he  discussed 3 major models. The EEA model prescribes the departure of the United Kingdom of the European Union without, however, depriving it access to the EU Single Market. This outcome is what he described as the ‘least harmful option’ for both  the EU but also the UK itself. Then he discussed the option of adopting a Swiss model of membership, which allows the UK and the EU to enter into bilateral agreements on particular sectors. The last potential outcome of a Brexit is a drastic severance of the UK from the EU without any immediate negotiations for a trade-related agreement, which, he argued, could lead to severe consequences in the context of investment arbitration.

In the next part of his presentation, he  explained the grounds upon which a successful claim could be brought against the United Kingdom in the case of a Brexit. First, he referred to the concept of ‘fair and equitable treatment’ (FET) as the relevant legal standard, which is accorded to investors by most BITs and is the most relied upon standard of protection in investment disputes. The popularity of FET lies in the flexibility and wide-ranging nature,  encompassing fundamental standards, such as good faith,  due process and non-discrimination. Certain key aspects of the FET principle have however been identified in arbitral jurisprudence, which include protection of the legitimate expectations of investors as well as the requirements of transparency and stability.

Focusing on legitimate expectations, he  highlighted the controversy surrounding the concept, which as he pointed out has been inconsistently interpreted by various arbitration tribunals and has been subject to ‘vociferous criticism’. In an attempt to explain how the concept operates in practice, he employed two factual scenarios of potential Investor-State Dispute Settlements. One of them was ‘The Indian Car Manufacturer’ scenario. Under the India – United Kingdom BIT,  ‘investments of investors of each contracting party shall at shall at all times be accorded fair and equitable treatment and shall enjoy full protection and security in the territory of the other Contracting party.’ Considering that the investment on the part of the Indian manufacturer in the UK was driven by an expectation to access the internal market,  one may effectively contemplate a breach of legitimate expectations, since in a Brexit situation, such access may be severed or impaired. The chances of success of the claim are higher if the relevant investment agreement had specific assurances of access to the EU Single Market in this regard.

In the context of intra-EU BITs, the United Kingdom has some 100 BITs with other states,  12 of which are with other EU countries. While the European Commission, in its amicus curiae submissions, put forward a range of inter-related arguments to support its position that BITS are superseded by and are incompatible with EU Law, the Tribunals have generally noted that the submissions of the Commission are of persuasive force at best and have sometimes stated explicitly that they do not agree with the Commission’s position. However, if the Commission is right, there is an uncertain future ahead for all these BITs of a post-Brexit British State.

Brussels I Regulation

Up next, Dr Assimakis Komninos, Partner at White and Case, sought to address the ruling of the CJEU in CDC v Akzo Nobel et al, a landmark decision regarding questions of jurisdiction under the Brussels I Regulation in the case of cartel damage proceedings. The preliminary ruling procedure was initiated a German Regional Court, which, inter alia asked the CJEU to elaborate on the bearing of jurisdiction and arbitration clauses in the supply contracts on the German court’s jurisdiction, in light of the requirement for effective enforcement of Article 101 TFEU and Article 53 EEA Agreement.

He first summarised the view given by AG Jaaskinen in delivering his Opinion, who argued that national courts were required by EU law not to apply an arbitration clause, or a jurisdiction clause not governed by Article 23 of the Brussels I Regulation, in cases where the implementation of such clause would  have hampered the effectiveness of Article 101 TFEU. This rather restrictive approach, he explained, was not followed by the Court of Justice. In fact, the CJEU refrained from explicitly addressing arbitration. Instead, the Court of Justice invited national courts to ensure that jurisdiction clauses ‘actually bind the parties’. In other words, the CDC judgment made it clear that jurisdiction clauses cover cartel damage disputes insofar the victim has specifically consented thereto.

He  submitted that the Court’s silence with respect to EU jurisdiction clauses to arbitration clauses was rather intentional, since it could have gone further in its findings, but it chose not to, and as such, the status quo of the more favourable reading of arbitration clauses by national courts should not be affected. If anything, he added, national courts may only exercise a certain degree of caution in the presence of cartel damages claims when ruling on the scope of the arbitration clause. However, he concluded, this does not imply that national courts should routinely require the plaintiff’s explicit consent in order to refer the case to arbitration, since this would amount to serious retrogression.

The arbitrability of competition law claims

Jean-Francois Bellis, Managing Partner at Van Bael & Bellis, gave  a presentation focusing on the arbitrability of competition law issues. Bellis began with a reference to the landmark Eco Swiss case which established by implication the doctrine of arbitrability of competition law. The ordre public nature that is attached to antitrust related disputes, Bellis explained, requires national Courts, when reviewing an arbitral award, to consider EU competition law rules and annul the award where they find the award to be contrary to such principles.

However, the standard of review that is required on the part of the national courts when observing EU Competition rules, was left untouched by the Court of Justice, rendering it one of the key areas of discussion in the field of arbitrability. He referred to the two standards of judicial review, namely the minimalist view, where the Courts render any further examination of competition law issues unnecessary if they are satisfied that the arbitrators have investigated and ruled on potential competition law breaches, and the maximalist view, where the courts perform an in-depth review on how the arbitral tribunal addressed competition law issues and are satisfied that the award did not violate public policy.

National law jurisprudence, he noted, reflects an overall hesitancy to exercise anything above an extrinsic control, which dates back to the case of Thales. In the latter, the French Courts ruled that in order to set aside an arbitral award, the violation of public policy in an international arbitration case must be ‘flagrant, effective and concrete’. The Thales standard has since been reaffirmed on multiple occasions by the French courts, in both enforcement and setting-aside proceedings. However, despite the little support for the maximalist approach, Advocate General Wathelet, in his recent opinion issued in Genentech v Hoechst, emphatically rejected the minimalist approach and called for a more detailed review on the part of the MS Courts on the basis that such fundamental public policy rules cannot be placed under the scope of arbitration proceedings.

In his concluding remarks, Bellis welcomed the new approach initiated by AG Wathelet, highlighting that the existence of an infringement to EU competition law may always be scrutinized ex officio, independent of whether the arbitral tribunal dealt with the issue and irrespective of whether the parties raised such question before the Courts. It now remains to be seen to which extent the CJEU would adopt AG’s Wathelet opinion in the future.

Moving further  from the Minimalist – Maximalist Approach: Let’s talk Pragmatism

Founding Partner of EDGE Legal, Dr Damien Geradin, on the other hand, argued that the two approaches, namely the minimalist and maximalist are extreme positions and endorsed a more pragmatic approach. In practice, he asserted, the reviewing process should not be restrained in its ability to review the award in any matter of depth when it is necessary. While in the vast majority of cases the minimalist approach is sufficient for review purposes, he emphasised that on certain occasions it is necessary for an in-depth review of the arbitral award to be implemented.

In support of his view, he referred to the opinion of AG Saggio in Eco Swiss, which highlighted the need to supervise arbitration awards to ensure that they are compatible with EU Competition rules, which are of great interest in the smooth functioning of the common market.

In relation to the means of investigation that can be used by a domestic Court in its review of the award, it was explained that the starting point is looking at the reasoning of the award. In most instances the reasoning of the award will suffice to identify whether the arbitral tribunal failed to detect anti-competitive behaviour which in turn amounted to a public policy breach. However, on situations where such reasoning is flawed, courts may need to go beyond the reasoning award.

More specifically, he  asserted that where the competition issues relevant to the dispute have been treated by the arbitral tribunal, the reviewing court should rely on the elements of fact that have been submitted to the tribunal without being necessarily bound by the legal characterization of these facts by the tribunal when it has reasons to  believe that it is incorrect. Yet, the reviewing court in principle should only require from the parties to submit factual elements that were not submitted to the tribunal or to produce testimonies in exceptional circumstances when the reviewing court has strong suspicions that the award may condone serious violations of competition law, such as for instance the existence of cartel, which would create a grave prejudice to the interests protected  by competition law. Hence, he  concluded that dismissing the minimalist – maximalist approach altogether and opting for a pragmatic approach, would enable a fair balance to be stricken between the finality of the award, a principle that sits at the core of international arbitration, and the need for domestic courts to ensure that the award does not amount to a serious breach of EU competition law, which is one of the main tools to protect free, undistorted trade within the EU internal market.

The new Investment Court System

Zena Prodromou, Associate in White and Case, followed up next, aiming to shed light on the European Commission’s radical proposal for a new Investment Court System for use in TTIP and future EU trade and investment negotiations. Prodromou opened her speech with some facts and figures on the TTIP and emphasised how the TTIP agreement is intended to enhance the EU-US partnership in the context of trade and investment. Subsequently, she explained that following the inclusion of ‘foreign direct investment’ as part of the common commercial policy under the Lisbon Treaty, the European Commission now negotiates on the basis of the mandates/negotiate directives given by the European Governments with various negotiating rounds. This negotiation, however, is no easy task, since, considering its material scope and the monumental size of economic relations.

Turning to the issue of dispute settlement between investors and states, which has been the most contentious point in the negotiations, she presented the latest proposal of the European Commission which seeks to replace the investor-state dispute mechanism and address scepticism against the ICS instrument. The new system comprises of standing tribunals at two instances: a Tribunal of First Instance, with 15 judges appointed jointly by the EU and the US governments, with 5 appointees each from among EU nationals, US nationals and third party nationals, and a Permanent Appeal Tribunal with 6 members jointly appointed for a six year term.

In terms of the interplay of the new Investment Protection System with domestic law, Prodromou highlighted the strict application of international law, since the Investment Courts would apply exclusively to the provisions of TTIP and would only be allowed to consider a domestic law of each Party taken into account as a matter of fact.  Where the Tribunal would be required to ascertain the meaning of a provision of a domestic law of a Party it would have to follow the interpretation made by that Party’s domestic courts.

Prodromou concluded by observing that the Commission’s proposal sought to address a sense of public distrust towards investment protection. The proposed changes to the ISDS, however, in essence touch upon the very fundamental elements and traits of arbitral proceedings. It is less clear whether, following this, we would be still talking about investment protection granted through arbitration or rather through a new dispute resolution mechanism.

The event was concluded by Dr. Nikos Lavranos, Secretary General of the European Federation for investment Law and Arbitration (EFILA). The animating and controversial topics continued to be discussed in the reception following the event, and all participants left with some new perspectives.

Brexit: Implications for the EU Reform of Investor-State Dispute Settlement

Sophie Nappert, 3 Verulam Buildings

Nikos Lavranos, EFILA

“Reproduced from Practical Law with the permission of the publishers. For further information visit www.practicallaw.com or call 020 7542 6664.”

Investor-state dispute settlement (ISDS) is an international arbitration mechanism that allows an investor from one country to bring arbitral proceedings directly against the state in which it has invested, provided that the investor’s home country and the host country of the investment have so agreed by treaty (see box ISDSbelow). ISDS is currently found in most modern international trade and investment agreements.

In the period since the entry into force of the Treaty of Lisbon, conferring on the EU exclusive competence over foreign direct investment in the European space, the European Parliament and the trade ministers of key member states, such as Germany, France and the Netherlands, have perceived that ISDS presents a number of shortcomings. These concerns were crystallised in the responses to a public consultation on the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP), currently being negotiated between the EU and the US (see Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP): tracker).

ISDS

Investor-state dispute settlement (ISDS) is a dispute resolution mechanism modelled on international arbitration, allowing an investor from one country to bring arbitral proceedings directly against the country in which it has invested, pursuant to the provisions of a treaty between the investor’s home state and the state hosting the investment.

ISDS provisions are contained in most modern international agreements including free trade agreements, bilateral investment treaties and multilateral investment agreements. If an investor from one country (the “home state”) invests in another country (the “host state”), both of which have agreed to ISDS, and the host state violates the rights granted to the investor under the international agreement between the home state and the host state (such as the right not to have property expropriated without prompt, adequate and effective compensation), then that investor may take the host state to international arbitration rather than sue in the domestic courts of the host state.

As a result, the European Commission has now tabled a proposal for a new dispute settlement system, the international court system (ICS), to be used in the EU’s future trade and investment treaties and, in the Commission’s words, “paving the way for a multilateral investment court” (see Legal update, European Commission proposes Investment Court System for EU trade agreements).

Instead of investor-state disputes being determined by an arbitral tribunal appointed by the parties, the Commission’s proposal is to create a judicial, two-tiered body consisting of a Tribunal of First Instance and an Appellate Tribunal. Party-appointed arbitrators would be replaced with “judges” unilaterally pre-selected by the state parties. As a result, the resolution of investor-state disputes by way a one-shot final arbitral award will be replaced with a two-instance procedure allowing for appeals on points of both fact and law.

The ICS proposal constitutes a strong push towards the institutionalisation and judicialisation of investor-state dispute settlement and is inspired by the WTO (World Trade Organisation) dispute settlement model applicable to state-to-state trade disputes. The important hallmarks of arbitration such as flexibility, finality and party autonomy will be essentially erased (see box ICS proposal: the concerns).

The EU’s seismic shift on its ISDS policy coincides with the UK’s consideration of its future as a member of the EU. If Brexit comes to pass, there will be legal repercussions on a number of levels as regards the UK’s trade and investment commitments at international law, and the protections currently enjoyed by UK investors abroad, including the ability to enforce arbitration awards worldwide pursuant to the 1958 New York Convention on the Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Arbitral Awards (the New York Convention). This is uncharted territory in many respects, and the opacity surrounding the progress of the current negotiations on the TTIP with the US adds to the uncertainty and lack of clarity.

ICS proposal: the concerns

While ISDS has been tested for decades and is a known quantity, it remains to be seen whether the benefits claimed by the proponents of the ICS will actually materialise. The EU’s proposal assumes that the ICS will not be declared by the Court of Justice of the European Union to be incompatible with EU law, as the CJEU has done consistently for other international tribunals, latterly the European Court of Human Rights).

For example, critics of ISDS claim that it has failed to take proper account of other relevant policy areas such as human rights, environmental law, intellectual property law and the “regulatory policy space” of states generally. The current ICS proposal does not specifically address those issues, and thus on its face provides little more credibility and legitimacy than does ISDS.

Another example concerns the qualifications required by the “judges” and the process of their selection by the contracting parties.

The proposal states that the only qualifications required of ICS “judges” for appointment to the Tribunal of First Instance is that they should be qualified for judicial office or a “recognised jurist”. For the Appeal Tribunal, the requirements are of qualification for the highest judicial office or being a “recognised jurist”. Interestingly, while the ICS proposal insists on expertise in public international law for its judges, expertise in investment law is deemed merely to be “desirable”. There is no requirement that (any of) the judges should demonstrate expertise in the policy areas that have fired up public debate and the anti-ISDS sentiment, such as human rights or environmental law.

The ICS proposal leaves the judge selection process entirely to the contracting parties. No transparency, public hearing or consultation with users or investors is currently envisaged. In addition, the “judges” are to be paid by the contracting parties and can be re-appointed by them. The anti-ISDS debate at the root of the ICS proposal claimed that the party selection and payment of arbitrators cast doubt as to the independence and impartiality of those arbitrators. The ICS proposal is open to precisely the same criticism.

Moreover, ISDS has been recognised as providing flexibility and a dispute resolution process which engages both parties, the state and the investor, on an equal footing. By contrast, the ICS replaces this flexibility with a fixed set of rules, removing any participation from the investor claimant regarding for example the choice of arbitration rules and the selection of arbitrators.

These points highlight some of the concerns which call for further reflection and analysis regarding whether the ICS proposal is the improvement on the arbitration-modelled ISDS claimed by its proponents.

We set out below some of the potential implications, at both macro- and micro-levels.

Macro-level implications

The first macro-level issue is that Scotland and Northern Ireland have indicated that they may not wish to remain part of the UK post-Brexit. The prospect of a fragmented Britain (no longer the UK) raises the question of whether the EU or the US would consider it worthwhile to negotiate a trade and investment agreement with a dismembered Britain. It also raises the question of what leverage Britain in its new incarnation would have in such treaty negotiations, as opposed to that which it now enjoys as part of the EU.

Another question is Brexit’s potential impact on the existing 100 or so bilateral investment treaties (BITs) that the UK has with individual EU member states (intra-EU BITs), as well as with third states. A post-Brexit British state might be able to keep all these BITs containing the classic ISDS provisions assuming that its respective state counterparties agreed.

In this scenario, Britain would avoid the untested ICS proposal and its potential shortcomings, and become an interesting safe harbour for foreign investors who may find it attractive to structure their investments through it, thereby avoiding the current insecurity created by the ISDS reforms. If it considers it necessary and useful, post-Brexit Britain could seek to negotiate BITs with the EU (as a single entity), as well as those countries with which the EU has either signed or is negotiating trade and investment agreements, namely Canada, China, the US, Singapore and Vietnam.

The question arises, however, whether Britain, which currently appears to favour retaining ISDS over the ICS, would be able to impose ISDS provisions on potential counterparties given the EU’s push for the ICS to apply to future trade and investment treaties, and the willingness of at least some of the countries on this list to accept ICS.

Britain’s ability to do this is likely to be affected by which dispute settlement system ends up being included in the TTIP. If the ICS comes to feature in the TTIP, ISDS in its current, arbitration-based form faces an uncertain future.

One important aspect of post-Brexit Britain retaining ISDS in its arbitration form rests on the question whether Britain in its new incarnation has the ability to remain a party to the New York Convention, to which over 150 states are parties, and which is a significant part of the protection afforded to investors by ISDS.

Micro-level implications

At a micro-level, the international investment agreements (IIAs) that have recently been agreed by the EU and its relevant trading partners, but are still awaiting signature or ratification (namely, CETA (the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement with Canada), the EU-Singapore Free Trade Agreement (FTA) and the EU-Vietnam FTA), would have to be amended to reflect Brexit.

Whether these trading partners would consider it attractive to negotiate new deals with Britain is an open question. The time and effort involved in the negotiation and conclusion of IIAs is not to be underestimated. The intervening period would be marked by legal uncertainty, to the detriment of UK investors abroad and Britain’s economy.

Another question is whether Brexit would have any impact on the ongoing TTIP negotiations, in particular with regard to the EU’s internal process of consulting with member states in adopting certain negotiating positions. Prime Minister David Cameron is said to be in favour of closing the TTIP as soon as possible because he considers it to have the potential of delivering huge benefits for the UK. At the same time, he appears generally untroubled by the anti-ISDS debate currently raging in many other EU member states.

A real and potentially significant impact

In conclusion, Brexit’s impact on the EU’s trade and investment policy would be real, as would its impact on post-Brexit Britain’s geo-political clout in the trade and investment arena. In contrast, it might offer interesting advantages, for both the UK as a host state and for investors who perceive the EU’s current investment policy as counter-productive. These advantages, however, are likely only to be felt after a significant period of uncertainty whilst post-Brexit Britain finds its footing, and in the short term are outweighed by that uncertainty.

Finally, the prospect of Brexit might cause the European Commission, the European Parliament and other member states to re-think the scope of their proposed “reforms” of investment treaties and ISDS.


Sophie Nappert is an arbitrator in independent practice at 3 Verulam Buildings, and Nikos Lavranos is Secretary General at EFILA.

Report on EFILA’s Annual Conference

by  Blazej Blasikiewicz and Juan Pablo Valdivia Pizzaro

Maison du Barreau, Paris

February 5th 2016

I. Introduction

The European Federation for Investment Law and Arbitration (EFILA) set out for a promising year with its Inaugural Conference in London in January of 2015. Last year proved to be full of notorious developments in the area of investment arbitration, especially as the TTIP negotiations and proposals evolved and materialized regarding the implementation of specific Investor State Dispute Settlement (ISDS) mechanisms. The ensuing months were characterized by a rich and often polarized debate on both specific aspects of investment arbitration and on the fundamentals, nature and aims of ISDS mechanisms.

In this context of agitated waters and contrasting ideas, once again EFILA brought together world-class dispute resolution practitioners, prominent arbitration experts, European government officials, leading scholars and representatives from market participants and international organizations in its 2016 Annual Conference entitled “Investment Arbitration 2.0?” which took place on February 5th, at La Maison du Barreau, in Paris.

The framework in which ISDS is being argued is characterized by controversy, heavy criticism and an imperative necessity for an open debate and innovative ideas. Therefore, the venue served as a meeting point for such a wide array of stakeholders to join in an analytical assessment of ISDS and exchange views on the many challenges and opportunities of investment arbitration. In doing so, not only some new features of investment arbitration regarding the EU policy on International Investment Agreements were discussed, but the speakers and participants engaged in a thought-provoking debate on diverse topics such as the pros and cons of investment arbitration, the rule of law and other complex issues such as transparency, states’ right to regulate, protection of property rights and democratic deficits.

This stimulating discussion was led by four panels, which critically explored some of the roots and primary issues of investment arbitration and presented provocative views on several of the most up-to-date issues on ISDS, with the objective of setting the ground for an improved and more robust framework of investment arbitration in the future.

II. Panel 1: Setting the scene: pros and cons of Investment arbitration

Prof. Dr. Gerard Meijer, Partner and Head of Arbitration team at NautaDutilh

Andrew Cannon, Partner at Herbert Smith Freehills LLP

Prof. Dr. Hans van Houtte, President of the Iran-United States Claims Tribunal

Prof. Dr. Robert Howse, Professor of International Law, New York University School of Law

Marie Talašová, Head of International Legal Services Department, Ministry of Finance, Czech Republic

Kamil Zawicki, Partner at Kubas Kos Galkowski

The first panel, acknowledging the importance of taking a step back in order to examine the roots and analyse some of its main traits, explored the pros and cons of investment arbitration. A refreshing view of its history and development was provided through the evolution of the International Centre for the Settlement of Investment Disputes (ICSID). Important emphasis was given to the revolutionary characteristics the system presented when it was introduced – it made the general rule of international law apply also to domestic investor-state contracts and it disconnected arbitration from domestic law – and to some remarkable victories that the system has achieved. The speakers recognized that many current features of the system represent an arguably unexpected feat, such as its importance for international law, the success of the system in relation to the number of cases brought to it, and its adaptation to a truly global era where the burgeoning number of BITs has shaped much of its evolution. In this respect the panel gave an interesting insight regarding ICSID being created primarily as an op-in system to be included in contracts between States and investors, and that it was not until the mid 1970s that BITs began including ICSID clauses. This practice has become standard and one of the main sources of ICSID arbitration.

However, it was also acknowledged that the system faces several important challenges, such as the trend to move towards broader regional economic agreements, the higher number of stakeholders involved (such as NGOs and supranational or regional organizations), new states’ policies regarding investment arbitration and foreign investment, and a growing opposition from different sectors of society. These issues, among others, have lead several States – such as Indonesia, South Africa and more than one South American country – to dramatically reassess their positions on BITs due to the perceived adverse impact that certain matters – e.g. treaty and forum shopping, lack of transparency, limitations to States’ right to regulate on issues of public interest and high costs of the proceedings – have in their internal affairs. This trend of criticism has also been materialized in the adoption of Model BITs by different countries, which reflect States’ policies regarding arbitration and foreign economic investment.

Speakers analysed the issue of contradictory case law in investment arbitration and the differences in the basis and instruments upon which such decision are made. The disparities among the wording or context of certain BITs was presented as one potential explanation for the different interpretations that arbitral tribunals have on arguably similar issues. The panel also put forward the view that time is of essence in the clarification of tendencies that constantly arise in investment arbitration.

There was agreement as to the importance of reforms regarding certain standards of protection, the controversial nature of the differentiated treatment between domestic and foreign investors, and the relevance of the wording of the related instruments and the role of states in shaping their content. Nevertheless, pertinent questions were raised as to the effectiveness of current attempts to solve part of the problem, like the establishment of appeal mechanisms in ISDS. In this regard, the limited success of somewhat similar mechanisms (such as the ICSID annulment mechanism) raises valid doubts as to the effectiveness of appeal bodies or instances within the framework of ISDS.

 The panel also addressed the criticisms as to the lack of transparency and rising costs in investment arbitration, the alleged pro-investor bias and the role of the media, both from the arbitration practitioner’s and the state’s point of view. The relationship between investment arbitration, the media and public opinion, and the suggested lack of empirical evidence to support a claim for pro-investor bias gave rise to an encouraging debate among the panel and the audience. The speakers pertinently pointed out the necessity of embarking upon reforms that would not lead to “killing” a system that, being far from perfect, has proven to be of vital importance.

III. Panel 2: Rule of Law and Investment Arbitration: promoting or holding back its advancement?

Prof. Dr. Loukas Mistelis, Clive M Schmitthoff Professo of Transnational Commercial Law and Arbitration at the Queen Mery University of London

Sir David Baragwanath KNZM QC, Appellate Judge and former President of the Special Tribunal for Lebanon

John Gaffney, Senior Associate, Arbitration at Al Tamimi & Company

Dr. Richard Happ, Partner at Luther LLP

Barton Legum, Head of Investment Treaty Arbitration Practice at Dentons

Dr. Patricia Nacimiento, Partner at Norton Rose Fulbright LLP

Prof. Dr. Mathias Wolkewitz, Head of Legal Affairs, Tax and Insurance at Wintershall Holding

The second panel engaged in a fruitful discussion arising from the necessity of examining investment arbitration as a dispute resolution mechanism from three different – but equally important – perspectives: the point of view of the investors, the recipient state and the citizenship. The panel highlighted that the interplay among these actors is currently characterized by a growing gap, which is reflected in the public disquiet in seeing arbitration as an appropriate means for adjudication of issues relating to public interests. These concerns have echoed in specialized and reputable media, which has also championed the case against the necessity or convenience of using BITs at all. The panel advocated the importance of a prompt and adequate response from the investment arbitration system in order to bridge the gap between the ISDS mechanisms and the public interests from which it cannot be detached.

The panel also discussed the alleged thorny relationship between ISDS, the rule of law and public perception. Transparency, once again, was given a central role in the debate. However, the effectiveness of the mechanisms to achieve transparency was put into question, since their success is often related to the specific interests of the parties involved. Speakers also advanced views highlighting the power of the States and their influence on the media in order to impact public opinion. The current tension between the ISDS system, States and public perception was provocatively referred to as “BITs biting back”.

The panel also provided an enlightening historical account of the “international minimum standard of treatment” (IMST) as the predecessor of investment law and its protection mechanisms, as known today. The difference between standards of protection for foreign and domestic investors brought forward the complex and fundamentally undemocratic nature of investment law as a limit for state action. By putting the relationship between investment law, the IMST, state regulatory powers and the rule of law under the spotlight, a heated debate ensued as the panel presented the argument that the inherent undemocratic nature of investment law does not diminish its contribution to the rule of law. In this regard, the speakers raised an interesting comparison between the IMST, investment law and human rights, as setting the limits for sovereign regulatory power.

The panel also examined the tension between the alleged lack of legitimacy of investment arbitration and its position within a system of check and balances governed by general and legitimate legal rules. Speakers underlined the systemic need to have effective foreign investment protection, the fact that investment treaties increase legal certainty, that investment arbitration is not placed in a vacuum beyond general rules of law and the importance of applying the rule of law as an equal standard to all parties involved. In addition, they recognized the contribution of investment arbitration in levelling the playing field and ultimately upholding the rule of law.

IV. Panel 3: Evolution in dispute resolution: third party funding, the role of secretaries and security of data in investment arbitration

Dr. Daniella Strik, Partner at Linklaters LLP

Dr. Andrea Carlevaris, Secretary General, ICC International Court of Arbitration (Paris) and Director of Dispute Resolution Services of the ICC.

Anya George, Senior Associate at Schellenberg Wittmer Ltd.

Charles Nairac, Partner at White & Case LLP

Prof. Dr. Stavros Brekoulakis, Professor in International Arbitration and Commercial Law, Queen Mary University of London.

Jurriaan Braat, Partner at Omni Bridgeway

 

The following panel looked at several specific issues in investment arbitration. On third party funding, the panel carefully pointed at the main challenges this issue posts regarding matters of confidentiality, conflict of interests, security for costs, and the question of who ultimately owns the claim and makes the decisions of the funded party. Questions were raised by the speakers and participants as to the proper approach to be taken in relation to a party that is being funded on the merits, the presumptions that may arguably be placed on the funded party’s ability to pay, the difficulty in the determination of the “real party” in the arbitration and the responsibilities to be placed on the parties to the proceeding. On the specific topic of providing security for costs, it was discussed if the existence of a third party funding arrangement should affect the outcome of an application for such security and if a presumption against the funded party could be validly placed regarding its potential inability to pay. It was recognized that the current general approach to the issue is to grant such application only in specific and extreme circumstances. It was acknowledged that the increasing number of parties that have sought or secured third party funding in investment treaty claims, the unregulated nature of this issue and the difficulty to determine the content and the extent of disclosure obligations on the funded party are pressing matters in investment arbitration.

Regarding the issue of arbitral secretaries, it was recognized that the main debate revolves around the issue of tasks and duties that secretaries may fulfil without interfering with the nature of the obligations placed on the arbitrators by the parties, often cited as intuito personae. The controversial issue of the core content and scope of the arbitrators’ mandate and the issues of parties’ expectations in relation to the conduct of the arbitration tribunal and the transparency in fulfilling its duties were addressed by the speakers as well. Reference was made to seminal articles on this issue (such as Partasides’ “The Fourth Arbitrator?”), and the importance of the distinction between the decision-making process (which would arguably not be a pre-defined matter of personal mandate) and the decision-making function (which would be much more closely related to the personal mandate entrusted upon the tribunal). Cultural differences between arbitral tribunals – and among the members of the tribunals themselves – were also given a place in the debate, an aspect often overlooked when analysing this issue. The panel underlined the importance of disclosure and strict supervision of the duties of the tribunal’s secretaries. The challenges that the notably large grey area in this topic represent, were also discussed by the speakers and the audience.

Finally, on the issue of data protection, the significant practical implications of the issue were argued and recognized by the panel. The main issues set forth in the debate related to transparency, data integrity protection and data manageability. Speakers encouraged the audience to engage in proper data protection techniques within the setting of investment arbitration despite the technical challenges that this may entail. Attention was drawn into the potential conflict between data protection, confidentiality and the right of free access to information in investor-state disputes.

V. Panel 4: Towards Institutionalization and Judicialisation. The Proposal for a Permanent Court

Dr. Erhard Böhm, Partner at Baier Rechtsanwälte

Yves Derains, Founding Partner at Derains & Gharavi

David Gaukrodger, Senior Legal Advisor, Investment Division, OECD Directorate of Financial and Enterprise Affairs

Dr. Nikos Lavranos, Secretary General of EFILA

Andrea Menaker, Partner at White & Case LLP

Yasmin Mohammad, Senior Counsel at Vannin Capital

 

The final panel analysed one of the hot topics of investment arbitration nowadays in the European arena. In an energizing fashion and through a more informal and open debate among the speakers and the participants in the audience, the panel set out to touch upon many of the issues related to the EU Commission’s proposal for the creation of the Permanent Court for ISDS. The panel put forward a critical analysis of the structure, traits and alleged objectives and benefits of the creation of such a Permanent Court; of the interplay between the proposed system, EU law and the Court of Justice of European Union; and of the effectiveness of the proposed alternative in solving the problems facing the ISDS system.

The problem of recognition and enforcement of awards rendered under the proposed system was critically assessed, including the potential problems that such decisions may face in being recognized as “awards” under and as referred to in the New York Convention of 1958. The panel and the participants also examined the interplay between the proposed alternative and the ICSID system, especially in relation to issues of jurisdiction. In this regard, the proposed mechanism was elegantly criticised as a “medicine being given to the wrong patient”.

The panel also referred to a common perception of an alleged trend of investment arbitration not truly resembling arbitration after the several significant changes that the system has undergone. The perceived standardization, judicialization and lack of adaptability may be seen as drawbacks by investors and may decrease the amount of trust that economic agents may be willing to place in the system.

Also, questions were framed regarding the legitimacy of such a drastic change in the way of dealing with potential investment claims, specifically arguing that a possible cause for such significant deviation could be found in the shift in the position of several countries from usual “claimants” to potential “defendants” in investment disputes. Speakers and the audience advanced provoking arguments on the financial incentives that the judges of such court would have, as well as on possible issues on conflict of interests, political independence, level of required expertise and the challenge of legitimately having both investors and states resorting to a system that enjoys the benefit of their confidence.

VI. Conclusion

The controversial nature of many of the topics presented and discussed during the Conference gave rise to a rich variety of opinions, positions and further debates on related issues. The diversity in the background of the speakers and the participants during the session gave the all parties the opportunity to argue and analyse the most salient matters in investment arbitration from a wide range of angles. Speakers and participants agreed on the importance of strengthening the investment arbitration’s legal framework through properly founded and necessary reforms, of assuring a more transparent relationship between ISDS system and the citizenship, of reaffirming investment arbitration as a vital means for upholding the rule of law and of recognizing and confronting the challenges and drawbacks of the system that have lead to a widespread emergence of social opposition and resistance.

The current state of affairs regarding the future of investment arbitration in the European Union made it important to go back to the fundamentals of investment arbitration with a critical view in order to thoroughly assess the new trends, latest proposals and pressing matters regarding ISDS. The legitimacy and effectiveness of the proposal of the EU Commission regarding the Permanent Court under the TTIP were heavily debated and the complex relationship between investment arbitration, states’ regulatory powers, public opinion, transparency and the rule of law has proven to be a fertile field for further debate and much-needed reforms. Despite the many different positions confronted during the debate regarding the current attempts to modify the framework of investment arbitration, it was generally agreed that amendments must take place in order to reinforce the position of investment arbitration as a modern, legitimate and efficient means for the resolution of investor-state disputes.

The quality and depth of the debate during the session, the presence of many of the top investment arbitration experts, practitioners and authorities, and the wide array of topics covered, keep placing EFILA at a unique position as an open and stimulating meeting point for future debates that are to shape the policies that will impact the ISDS system, its evolution and improvement in the years to come.

The Shortcomings of the Proposal for an “International Court System” (ICS)

by Dr. Nikos Lavranos LLM, Secretary General of EFILA*

During 2015 it became clear that the European Commission was under mounting pressure from the European Parliament (EP), Trade Ministers of several EU Member States, anti-ISDS NGOs and the media to propose more “reforms” of the investor-State dispute settlement (ISDS) system that is contained in CETA and envisaged to be included in TTIP as well.

EFILA decided to establish a Task Force – consisting also of non-EFILA members – to analyse the final proposal for a so-called “International Court System” (ICS), which the European Commission formally adopted on 12 November 2015 and transmitted it to the US as a basis for further negotiations within the context of the TTIP negotiations.

During the debate in the European Parliament and among several Trade Ministers of EU Member States one key issue pointing towards a “solution” and which was continuously repeated was the creation of a permanent investment court consisting of publicly appointed judges. It was argued that in contrast to the current system of ad hoc arbitration consisting of party-appointed arbitrators, which has been characterized as “private”, behind closed doors dispute resolution, which biased towards the investor, a permanent investment court with judges would ensure fairer and better adjudication of investment disputes. Another related key issue, which was considered important for a “solution” was the creation of an appeal mechanism. Again the rather simplified characterization that ISDS disputes have no appeal possibility and are completely beyond the control of national courts, was used as a justification for the need of an appeal mechanism.

The European Commission had to incorporate these points otherwise a ratification of TTIP by the EP and the Member States would seem rather illusory. Having had significant experience as a disputing party in the WTO, which happens to include the Appellate Body as a permanent (quasi)judicial body, it was a small step for the European Commission to copy and paste many of the WTO dispute settlement elements into its ICS proposal.

The structure of the 60-pages EFILA Task Force analysis is as follows:

Chapter 1 analyses not only the ICS proposal as such, but also the process that preceded the proposal. This is important in order to understand the political context in which this proposal is embedded. It critiques certain aspects of the ICS proposal and raises a number of issues which the Task Force considers should be addressed in developing the ICS proposal further.

Chapter 2 provides an extensive overview of the already existing forms of appeal and annulment of investment awards. It also highlights the reform efforts in this regard by the PCA and the ICSID Secretariat. This overview provides a detailed picture of the status quo (including both the mechanisms and methods of operation), from which the ICS proposal departs. This analysis also draws critical attention to features or elements of the current system of ISDS which could be addressed in developing the ICS proposal.

Chapter 3 turns towards the WTO dispute settlement system by first explaining the features of the appeal system and then by examining to what extent this system could successfully be transplanted into the ICS and the limitations in so-doing.

Finally, Chapter 4 wraps up this analysis by providing some general conclusions as to matters which require consideration by the Contracting Parties in developing the ICS proposal further. In particular, the issues highlighted concern the methods of selection of the judges (and the implications of a move towards a system whereby the Respondent maintains, but the Claimant is deprived of, a role), the size of the pool of candidates for the two-tiered system, the relationship between the ICS and the CJEU and how the ICS will operate in the wider context of resolution of investor-state disputes under other instruments.

The conclusions of the Task Force report can be summarized as follows:

  1. The paper concludes that the ICS proposal is, first and foremost, a bold move to appease the EP and the public opinion in many EU Member States, which are critical against TTIP generally, and in particular against including any type of ISDS. The ICS proposal attempts to make the inclusion of an investor-state dispute settlement mechanism in TTIP politically acceptable, while at the same time trying to address the perceived shortcomings of the existing ISDS.
  1. The paper notes that – in contrast to the public perception – mechanisms for limited review of investment arbitration awards are already in place, such as the ICSID annulment mechanism and the setting aside procedure for non-ICSID awards by national courts. These mechanisms – while not perfect – provide useful corrective tools.
  1. The analysis of the WTO dispute settlement mechanism illustrates that caution should be exercised in simply transplanting it to investor-state disputes. The reason is that WTO law is structurally different from investment law, serves different purposes and has different users.
  1. Generally, it can be concluded that the ICS proposal clearly breaks with the current party-appointed, ad-hoc ISDS as provided for in practically all BITs and FTAs. The main result is that it deprives claimants of any role in the appointment of the judges, while giving the respondent States the exclusive authority to do so, albeit in advance of a particular case. The appointment of the judges by the Contracting Parties raises several problems, which the ICS proposal does not sufficiently address.
  1. The pre-selection of the TFI and AT judges by the Contracting Parties carries the inherent risk of selecting “pro-State” individuals, in particular since they are paid by the States (or rather their tax payers) alone. Apart from this danger, it remains doubtful whether a sufficient number of appropriately qualified individuals with the necessary expertise can be found. This is particularly true since many professionals currently working in arbitration may be excluded on the basis that they could be considered to be biased. The pool of TFI and AT judges would seem to be limited to academics, (former) judges and (former) Governmental officials. That might not be sufficient to guarantee the practical experience and expertise needed and/or independence from the State.
  1. The standard of impartiality and independence of the judges is highly subjective, and their independence on a practical level is not assured by the proposed text. Also, the system of challenging TFI judges and AT members can be further criticised for envisaging that the presiding judge will decide the challenge against one of his own colleagues on the bench, rather a decision being made by an independent outside authority.
  1. The system of determination of Respondent (in the case of the EU or Member States), in particular the binding nature of that determination, which is done by the EU and its Member States alone, creates significant disadvantages for the claimant and does not allow the ICS tribunals to correct any wrong determinations. This could result in cases being effectively thrown out because of a wrong determination of the Respondent.
  1. Since the ICSID Convention is not applicable to the EU, the recognition and enforcement of

ICS decisions remains limited to the EU and the US. The proposal also fails to clarify the difficulties elated to the New York Convention 1958.

  1. The ICS proposal does not address the difficult legal situation between the CJEU and other international courts and tribunals. There is no reason to believe that the CJEU would be more positive towards the ICS as compared to its outright rejection of the European Court of Human Rights when it comes to the potential interpretation or application of EU law. Also, the CJEU’s consistent rejection of any direct effect of WTO AB panel reports – even those that have been approved by the DSB and after the implementation deadline has lapsed – raises doubts as to the legal effects of ICS decisions within the European legal order.
  1. In sum, the suggested creation of a two-tier (semi)permanent court system would give the Contracting Parties a significantly stronger role in the whole dispute settlement process – potentially at the expense of both the investor/claimant and the authority of the ICS. In particular, the appeal possibility carries the risk of burdening small and medium investors by increasing the potential length of the proceedings and costs.
  1. While the US position towards the ICS proposal remains unclear for the time being, it also remains unclear how the ICS proposal could be multilateralized. Indeed, the perceived shortcomings of the current ISDS system is based on the fact that more than 3,000 BITs/FTAs are in place, which have been concluded by practically all countries in the world. The ICS proposal – limited to TTIP and perhaps extended to CETA – does not change that. The way the UNCITRAL Transparency Rules of 2014 are incrementally applied by way of an opt-in system established by a separate international treaty could be a possible way forward.
  1. As the TTIP negotiations between the US and the EU are now focusing on the ICS proposal, this is a perfect moment to further improve the proposal by addressing the matters identified in this analysis.
  1. Finally, the US and the EU should also consider whether it would not be more preferable to modify and improve existing systems, such as turning the ICSID annulment procedure into a full appeal mechanism.

This in-depth analysis is very timely and arguably one of the first ones following the formal adoption of the ICS proposal by the European Commission last November.

The EFILA Task Force paper raises many issues and provides some answers, but certainly leaves many problems untouched. At the EFILA Annual Conference which will take place on 5 February in Paris, the last panel will specifically discuss this report. All members of the investment arbitration community are welcome to (still) register for the conference or to submit their constructive comments to Dr. Nikos Lavranos, LLM, Secretary General of EFILA, at: n.lavranos@efila.org

Transnational Court of Investment Arbitration

by Duarte G. Henriques, BCH Advocados*

In the context of the discussions surrounding the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP), much criticism has been raised against ISDS (Investor-State Dispute Settlement). We know now that the European Parliament echoed public complaints and voted against the inclusion of an ISDS mechanism in the TTIP. It further recommended to the European Commission that disputes falling under the investment protection framework should be adjudicated by a system similar to state courts, where the decision-makers are appointed from among judges from the US, EU and third countries. Accordingly, the proposal advances the creation of a new court system (Investment Court System) consisting of a Tribunal of First Instance and an Appeal Tribunal.

At the same time, this proposal resonates the suspicions raised regarding the lack of impartiality of some arbitrators and paves the way to the implementation of an adjudication system subject to public scrutiny.

However meritorious it could be, this idea nevertheless forecloses the right of the investor to (at least) participate in the process of selection of the decision-maker, a principle paramount to international arbitration stemming from the distrust of a system where the adjudicator might be swayed by parochial views, not to mention political and economic pressures.

I am still not convinced that an arbitral system is not apt to provide a neutral, impartial and independent means for solving disputes between foreign investors and host states. But I do not look at the current ISDS status quo without some hesitation either, especially if we think of the system instituted by ICSID, its locations positioning and its “ad hoc committee” revision method. The circumstance that the ICSID system operates under the aegis of a banking institution (World Bank) lending money to sovereign states, but at the same time with a level of financial power strong enough to go as far as to impose changes in regulation, and in the economic and political environment of those countries, gives room for criticism concerning its bias in favour of investors. This criticism has led a few nations (Venezuela and Bolivia, for instance) to withdraw from the ICSID Convention, claiming that BITs were made to protect “investments” and not “investors”.

On the other hand, at first glance I do not have to struggle with the idea of waiving the principle of finality of arbitral awards: indeed, why not submit the arbitral decision to a revision similar to the state courts system of appeals? In my country, foreign investors wishing to pursue their claims before the state courts are given the right to appeal against the decision. This right to appeal, however, is subject to limitations: it may be restricted to a single level of appeal (usually the “Court of Appeal”), and it only comprises the revision of the factual findings if the decision contains “egregious” errors of determination. Interpretation and application of the legal rules are subject to full revision.

That being said, a suggestion (and here I underline that the following is a mere suggestion, subject to further development) might be put forward to create an international body for settling investment disputes. Most likely, the idea has already been suggested, but in any case, I will dare to name it as the “Transnational Court of Investment Arbitration”.

Explaining the idea involves speaking about each of its four words.

Firstly, it would be a Court in the sense that it consists of a permanent institutional body with permanent facilities, structured in the same fashion as traditional state courts, and permanently dedicated staff. Arbitrators would be vested with “jus imperii” powers. Witnesses would be subject to criminal prosecution in the case of false statements, disobedience, and similar behaviour. Arbitrators, counsel, parties’ representatives, witnesses, experts, secretaries and other administrative staff would be submitted to a single regulation system, including a Code of Ethics.

Secondly, it would be a body dedicated exclusively to settling disputes between foreign investors and host states. Therefore, it would be an “Investment” Court. Underlying this notion is the consideration of the jurisdictional issue, that is, discovering, inter alia, what kind of legal instrument would afford a protection under this ISDS to the relevant “investments”. As long as an international instrument protecting foreign investments provides for arbitration as a mechanism to solve disputes arising therefrom, the Transnational Court would hold jurisdiction.

Thirdly, however closely this body might resemble a traditional “court”, it would be an institution managing arbitration (and possibly mediation in a two-tiered process). Therefore, parties are allowed to appoint their arbitrators, but also to have a tailor-made proceeding, including waiving of the right to appeal and the setting-up of time schedules, costs, bifurcation, and so on and so forth. Given the particularities of this kind of arbitration – which deals with public interests of the states involved – the right to appeal and public hearings would be set-up by default. Of course, the “traditional” requirements as to the independence, impartiality and neutrality of the adjudicators would apply, and this institution would act as an appointing authority as well (chair and arbitrators not appointed by defaulting parties). Final awards would “circulate” (that is, would be enforceable with no need for prior recognition) within the territory of all jurisdictions adhering to this system and within the geographic perimeter of the New York Convention of 1958.

Lastly, it would be a transnational court, in the sense that would cover all jurisdictions adhering to this system, potentially within the context of a multilateral free-trade agreement. That brings us to the potential to use an existing legal and institutional setting, such as the WTO, and be attached to it at the logistical level. However, it would be more than that. It would have to be a body truly independent from the states adhering to the international convention enacting this system.

Of course, it would be necessary to provide for initial financial funding from contracting states until reaching a “cruising speed” where the system would be financially self-sustained concerning maintenance and administrative costs.

Its state constituency would democratically elect the managing and supervising bodies by “one country one vote”.

Another concern related to the current ISDS system is its geographic accessibility. Currently, investment disputes are managed in Washington (ICSID) or The Hague (PCA), with hearing locations settled in association with arbitral institutions such as the DIS in Germany, the CIETAC in China or the Singapore International Arbitration Centre in Singapore. This concern suggests the notion of spreading a few regional or continental sub-Courts (or Courts of First Instance) across the globe. The distribution would be drawn according to the caseload currently brought by investors against host states. Looking below at the last statistics available at the ICSID website (2015-2), we could think of the following continental or regional Sub-Courts and respective locations: 1) South America, in Chile or Uruguay; 2) Western Europe, in Warsaw or Kiev; 3) Eastern Europe, in Geneva, Paris or London; 4) North America and Central America, in New York or Miami; 5) Africa, in Cairo, Egypt or Abuja, Nigeria; 6) Australasia, in Sydney; 7) Asia, in Beijing or HK.

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This system would include what we may call “intra-EU” disputes, that is, disputes between European investors and EU member states.

The first instance level of this system would be topped by a “Superior Court” based on a movable location for a term of 5 to 10 years. Contrary to the “first instance” level, where the decision-makers would be arbitrators chosen by the parties, the jurisdictional body of the Superior Court would consist of the President of the highest Courts of Justice of each contracting state. With the exception of “egregious” determinations of facts, the Superior Court would have jurisdiction on matters of law only, and its decisions would be published.


Duarte G. Henriques, Rua Fialho de Almeida – 32 – 1 E, 1070-129 Lisbon • Portugal, dghenriques@bch.ptwww.bch.pt.

Right to Regulation & Investment Court System: Alternative to ISDS? (Part I)

   by Pratyush Nath Upreti, Upreti & Associates*

Intellectual Property is sexy! Its romantic endeavor with other branches of law makes it appealing for IP scholars. This romance can be seen through the lens of the global Intellectual property regime. In today’s industrialized world, the landscape of the intellectual property is changing. Mostly, all forms of ‘intellectual property’ have raised debate in the trade agreements domain, making it an important aspect of trade negotiation. The open market economy encourages the developed countries to opt for Investment/Trade Agreement such as Free trade agreement (FTA), Bilateral Investment Treaties to attract investors by strengthening IP regimes. It is evident that IP as incentive commodity has turned into assets, trading commodity.

Similarly, the expectation of investors is increasing. Recent cases such as Philip Morris v. Uruguay have revealed the complexity and potential overlap between intellectual property, Investment Law, and Trade Law. The nature of claims raised in such cases has raised serious concerns regarding state’s sovereign right to regulate, which is reflected in the ongoing negotiation of Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP). The recent public consultation report on investment protection and investor-to-state dispute settlement (ISDS) in the TTIP reveals that the Commission received a total of nearly 15,000 replies and an overwhelming majority showed concern to the inclusion of ISDS in TTIP.

One of the aspects is the EU Right to regulate provisions in the Investment Agreement. The concern raised is that the ISDS would be a potential limitation to the rights of government to regulate on public interest. Earlier September, European Commission published a draft text of the Investment Chapter in the proposed Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) between the EU and the US, propose the ‘Investment Court’, which has generated discussion.

Right to Regulation

According to the report from the Swedish National Board of Trade, the term ‘right to regulate’ is misleading. The report refers right to regulate as ‘to the extent to which the state can legislate and make decisions without running the risk of being found in violation of the treaty and having to pay damages’. It has been an established principle of state sovereign right to regulate on public, health and environment affairs. But the diverse opinions of tribunals and increasing legitimate expectation of Investor has seriously narrowed the state right to regulate.  The very fundamental question is to what extent can investors expectations rise?

In Eli Lilly vs. Canada under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Eli Lilly a pharmaceutical company invoked investment claims under UNCITRAL rules, on the ground that the patent invalidation by a Canadian Court violated a principle of fair and equitable treatment, including Lilly’s legitimate expectation about the treatment of its investment and Canada’s obligation to refrain from conduct that is arbitrary, unfair, unjust and discriminatory. Further, it was argued that ‘Lily was entitled to reasonably rely on the stability, predictability, and consistency of Canada’s Legal and business framework existing at each stage of the establishment, expansion, and development of Lilly’s Investment.

The above cases raised a fundamental question on the scope of application of ‘fair and equitable treatment or reasonable expectation of investment’ under intellectual property investment claims. The investor expectation should not be subjective and not all investor expectations are legitimate. Moreover, the arguments put forward by the claimant in Lilly directly come in conflict with state sovereign right to regulate the domestic Intellectual Property. The investor completely ignores the difference between the pre-existing rights and post-existing rights. Both the pre and post rights have limitation. The right does not arise if a prerequisite is not fulfilled. Similarly, once rights are acquired, they cannot be absolute; they are subject to changes on several grounds.

In practice, fair and equitable treatment and full protection and security are not absolute, there being limitations. Parkerings-Compagniet AS v. Lithuania tribunal analyzed the state sovereign power to regulate lies on higher foot then claims of free and equitable treatment. The Tribunal stated:

 

“It is each state’s undeniable right and privilege to exercise its sovereign legislative power. A state has the tight to enact, modify or cancel a law at its own discretion. Save for the existence of an agreement, in the form of a stabilization clause or otherwise, there is nothing objectionable about the amendment brought to the regulatory framework existing at the time an investor made its investment. As a matter of fact, any businessman or investor knows that law will evolve over time. What is prohibited however is for a State to act unfairly, unreasonably or inequitably in the exercise of its legislative power.”

Similarly, in Chemtura v. Canada, the tribunal upheld the Canadian government’s right to legislate laws based on scientific reviews and dismissed the investor’s claims. However, critics of ISDS have raised that such limitation of state right to regulate may bring regulatory snare. Therefore, Europe is trying to narrow down the scope of provision under the agreement to avoid vague interpretation by a tribunal. The previous agreements such as CETA and EU Singapore FTA, were drafted in a way to have a higher benchmark on the right to regulate.

For example under CETA, Article X.9 clears list down the contents of fair and equitable treatment such as (i) denial of justice in criminal, civil or administrative proceedings (ii) fundamental breach of due process (ii) arbitrary conduct and among others. The closed list avoids unwarranted interpretation by the tribunal, which may affect state right to regulate. Similarly, Article X.11 excludes expropriation claims on compulsory license and exclusively explains that indirect expropriation occurs when measure substantially deprives the investor property right such as (i) right to use (ii) enjoy and dispose of its investment (ii) transfer of title or seizure. In spite of such approach, public outcry on ISDS provisions seems to be a major hurdle for the European Union.  Therefore, to negate such a scenario and create a positive public opinion on TTIP, the Commission has proposed ‘Investment Court’ to address Investor claims.

Investment Court: Coffin for ISDS?

The concept of ‘Investment Court’ has been floating through Commission Draft Text of TTIP, which opens with a disclaimer that the document is solely for internal purpose and the commission will consult with the EU’s Member States and discuss the proposal with the European Parliament before presenting it formally to the United States.  The said EU proposal for an Investment Court is described as ‘over ambitious’ and deprives investors of the traditional possibility to choose their arbitrator. The proposal establishes a two tier court system; Tribunal of First Instance (tribunal) and Appeal Tribunal. The tribunal will follow the existing international arbitration rules of ICSID and UNCITRAL. Similarly, Article 13 allows the tribunal to apply only international law and interpret agreements in accordance with customary rules of interpretation. The provision expressly argues that the tribunal is not obliged by domestic interpretations of the law and the tribunal shall not have jurisdiction to determine the legality of a measure under the domestic law of the disputing party.

One of the criticisms of ISDS was the lack of transparency and maverick arbitrators. The proposed Investment Court has overcome such criticism. According to Article 11 of the proposal, judges of the Tribunal and members of the Appeal Tribunal must be persons whose independence is beyond doubt. Similarly, judges shall not be affiliated with government or organizations and also upon appointment, they shall refrain from acting as counsel in any pending or new investment protection disputes under this or any other agreement or domestic law.  In addition, the party to the dispute may challenge the appointment of the judge if it considers that the judge or member has a conflict of interests.

The very fundamental principle of investment arbitration is the investor’s active role in the appointment of an arbitrator. The proposed draft takes away this privilege of investors. However, the proposed draft gives an opportunity to the United States and the European Union to appoint permanent judges to the Appeal Tribunal and also to the Tribunal of First Instance.

This makes me suspicious regarding the possible political appointment of judges. This is very much possible, considering the worries of EU. Moreover, such pro-state judges will keep in mind to avoid unnecessary interpretation which limits the state’s right to regulation.  I believe that the investors cannot accept such an appointment process as the very fundamental reason for the involvement of investors in the appointment process was to avoid political interference. Therefore, I think the Commission should reconsider the appointment of judges and – if needed – some share should also be given to investor to balance the appointment process.

The proposed draft clearly fills the demand for more transparency in the arbitration process by abiding with the ‘UNCITRAL Transparency Rules’ and lists down documents to be publicly made available upon request. Additionally, it goes beyond and allows disclosure of third party funding to the parties.  This is indeed a very important aspect of the proposed draft.

In the end, I conclude that the proposed Investment Court seems a way to avoid ISDS. Moreover, it looks that proposal aims to gather positive public opinion on TTIP. The major question is even if the proposal of Investment Court System is accepted, then will it be applied retrospectively to all previous several Investment Agreement to which EU is member? If not, then there is always a scope of diverse opinion, which may narrow the state right to regulate. Time will tell whether ‘Investment Court’ is coffin to ISDS or muffin to the EU trade policy.

Let time be the protagonist.


Pratyush Nath Upreti recently completed Advanced Master (LLM) Intellectual Property Law & Knowledge Management (IPKM) from Maastricht University, Netherlands.  He is also an active member of New IP Lawyer’s, a wing of school of Law and its research centre SCule (Science, Culture and the Law) under University of Exeter, United Kingdom. He can be reached by p.upreti@student.maastrichtuniversity.nl